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Our Progress

The struggle against wage discrimination goes back over a century in New Brunswick. Since then, the promotion of pay equity has had notable success. Over the years, we’ve seen the implementation of proactive measures and investments in key vulnerable sectors at both the provincial and federal level but our work is not over!

LEARN MORE about landmark events in pay equity history in both New Brunswick and Canada. Check out the links for more information.

Milestones:

February 1, 2019
ESIC Final Report
   
New Brunswick

The Advisory Committee on Living Wage and Pay Equity of the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation’s (ESIC) final report is released and recommends that the government “adopt comprehensive pay equity legislation that covers employees in both the public and private sectors”.

On
December 14, 2018
The Liberal Party introduces Bill 4
   
New Brunswick

The Liberal Party introduces Bill 4, An Act to Amend the Pay Equity Act, 2009 to extend current pay equity legislation to the private sector. The motion to send the Bill to the Standing Committee on Law Amendments is rejected along Party lines: the Liberal Party and the Green Party voting in favor and the Progressive Conservative Party and the Alliance of People voting against.

On
December 13, 2018
Pay Equity Act receives Royal Assent
    Canada

The Pay Equity Act receives Royal Assent. However, there is no timeline for the adoption of the regulations necessary for the Act to come into force.

On
October 30, 2018
Pay Equity Act
    Canada

The government introduces the Pay Equity Act. It applies to the federal public service, parliamentary workplaces, and federally regulated sectors with at least 10 employees such as banks, telecommunications and interprovincial transportation.

On
June 9, 2016
It's Time to Act
    Canada

The Special Committee on Pay Equity presents the report It's Time to Act to the House of Commons. It recommends "that the Government of Canada repeal the Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act" and  "draft proactive pay equity legislation within 18 months of the tabling of this report".

On
February 3, 2016
House of Commons Motions for Committee
    Canada

The House of Commons adopts a motion introduced by NDP MP Sheila Malcolmson to create a committee to conduct hearings on the matter of pay equity and to propose a plan to adopt a proactive federal pay equity regime.

On
June 1, 2014
Pay Equity in Care Services in New Brunswick
   
New Brunswick

Ruth Rose, adjunct professor of economics at the Université du Québec à Montréal, produces the report Pay Equity in Care Services in New-Brunswick and a summary. She concludes that the methodology used by the New Brunswick government for the community caregiving sector is incorrect and that results should have been around $20 per hour.

On
April 1, 2014
Results for the Community Residence Sector
   
New Brunswick

The government releases the pay equity results for the community residence sector. These are higher than the previous sectors (ranging from $14 to $16 per hour), thanks to a slight change in the methodology. The Coalition highlights that methodological errors subsist.

On
January 1, 2013
Comment on the Results of the Government of New Brunswick’s Pay Equity Program for Non-Legislated Sectors
   
New Brunswick

The Coalition for Pay Equity releases its Comment on the Result of the Government of New-Brunswick's Pay Equity Program for Non-Legislated Sectors and asks the government to improve the methodology developed for workplaces without male comparators.

On
June 1, 2012
Public Pay Equity Reports
   
New Brunswick

The pay equity reports for the home care sector, child care sector, and transition house sector are made public. Results are dismal; they range from $12 to $14 per hour.

On
April 2, 2010
Pay Equity Adjustments
   
New Brunswick

The provincial government announces that five groups from the private sector will receive pay equity adjustments in 2010-2011: nursing home workers, child-care workers, home support workers, transition home workers, and community residence workers. Elections are called before the adjustments are made.

On
April 1, 2010
Pay Equity Act, 2009 Comes Into Force
   
New Brunswick

The Pay Equity Act, 2009 comes into force.

On
February 2, 2009
Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act
    Canada

Stephen Harper’s minority government introduces the Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act which relegates pay equity to collective bargaining and the market, and imposes up to $50,000 fines to unions which support their members to lodge a pay equity complaint. The Act never comes into effect.

Off
January 1, 2009
Pay Equity Act, 2009
   
New Brunswick

Mary Schryer, Minister responsible for the Status of Women, introduces the Pay Equity Act, 2009 in the Legislative Assembly. The Act covers the civil service, health, education and Crown corporations. It receives Royal Assent on June 19, 2009 and will come into force in April 2010.

Off
January 1, 2007
Progress Reports on 2005-2010 Wage Gap Action Plan
   
New Brunswick

The government releases three progress reports on the 2005-2010 Wage Gap Action Plan in 2007, 2008, and 2009, but it never publishes a final report.

Off
December 1, 2005
Report on Bill 77
   
New Brunswick

The Law Amendment Committee releases its report on Bill 77. It opposes the adoption of the Bill but supports the voluntary measures outlined in the Wage Gap Action Plan. However, it recommends legislating in five years if no progress is made.

On
June 1, 2005
2005-2010 Wage Gap Action Plan
   
New Brunswick

Minister Margaret-Ann Blaney releases her 2005-2010 Wage Gap Action Plan in response to the Round Table’s recommendations. The plan outlines four goals, including increasing “the use of pay equity practices” in the private sector and achieving “pay equity in the public service”, without legislation.

On
November 1, 2004
Law Amendment Committee holds public hearings
   
New Brunswick

The Law Amendment Committee holds public hearings and receives written submissions on Bill 77. Out of 34 public presentations, 30 were in favor of Bill 77.

On
June 1, 2004
Bill 77
   
New Brunswick

The leader of the New Democratic Party, Elizabeth Weir, seconded by liberal MLA Carmel Robichaud, introduces Bill 77. The Bill is sent to the Law Amendment Committee for review.

On
January 1, 2004
Pay Equity Task Force submits the report
    Canada

The federal Pay Equity Task Force submits the report, Pay Equity: A New Approach to a Fundamental Right, to the Ministers of Justice and Labour. It shows that the protections within the Canadian Human Rights Act have been a failure, and recommends a stand-alone pay equity act.

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January 1, 2003
Wage Gap Roundtable’s report
   
New Brunswick

The Wage Gap Roundtable’s report recommends voluntary measures and, if there is limited progress after five years, “appropriate wage gap reduction legislative mechanisms, applicable to both the private and public sectors.” The Coalition for Pay Equity and the NB Federation of Labour issue independent recommendations and call for pay equity legislation immediately.

Off
January 1, 2002
Wage Gap Roundtable
   
New Brunswick

Margaret-Ann Blaney, then Minister responsible for the Status of Women, sets up the Wage Gap Roundtable to study the contributing factors to the wage gap between men and women.

Off
June 16, 2001
New Brunswick Coalition for Pay Equity is founded
   
New Brunswick

The New Brunswick Coalition for Pay Equity is founded on June 16.

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January 1, 2000
Pay Equity petition the government
   
New Brunswick

The New Brunswick World March of Women 2000 committee and the Women’s Union for Pay Equity petition the government for a law on pay equity.

Off
May 23, 1998
Women’s Union for Pay Equity
   
New Brunswick

The Fédération des dames d’Acadie establishes the Women’s Union for Pay Equity on May 23.

Off
January 1, 1996
The Wage Gap: Causes, Consequences, Actions Published
   
New Brunswick

The NB Advisory Council on the Status of Women (ACSW) publishes the working document The Wage Gap: Causes, Consequences, Actions.

Off
January 1, 1991
Pay Equity Steering Committee
   
New Brunswick

The government publishes the results of the pay equity exercises completed under the Pay Equity Act in the report Pay Equity Summary of Activities of the Pay Equity Steering Committee.

Off
January 1, 1989
Pay Equity Act
   
New Brunswick

Frank McKenna’s government passes the Pay Equity Act, which applies to employees in Part I of the civil service (i.e. civil servants).

Off
January 1, 1985
Section 15
    Canada

Section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on Equality Rights comes into force: “Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.”

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January 1, 1984
Equality in Employment: A Royal Commission Report
    Canada

Judge R.S. Abella releases Equality in Employment: A Royal Commission Report that makes several recommendations including: “Equal pay for work of equal value should be part of all employment equity programs”.

Off
January 1, 1977
Canadian Human Rights Act
    Canada

The Canadian Human Rights Act comes into force. It applies to federal jurisdiction, including the territories. Section 11 prohibits wage discrimination between male and female employees performing work of equal value.

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January 1, 1967
New Brunswick Human Rights Act
   
New Brunswick

The government enacts the New Brunswick Human Rights Act, which includes article 3(1): “No employer shall discriminate against any person in respect to employment or any term or condition of employment because of sex.”

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January 1, 1965
Same Minimum Wage
   
New Brunswick

The government enacts a law stipulating the same minimum wage for men and women.

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January 1, 1899
Robert Emmerson
   
New Brunswick

Robert Emmerson, the then Premier of NB, argues that a woman received little more than half the wages a man received for the same work and that this was discrimination.

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